Tag Archives: Eagles

Written by Bryan Meyers

The night before the Eagles Super Bowl victory parade, I strolled down Vine Street in the cold and windy rain. Heading for Logan Square, I saw the Jumbotrons with 24-speaker setups. As I walked the Ben Franklin Parkway, dozens of port-o-potties were stationed alongside the stretch of road leading to the Art Museum. Production trucks rumbled as generators offered light to workers drenched in rain. The Eagles flags flew high in the night.

The City of Philadelphia planned for approximately 2 million people to attend the Eagles Super Bowl victory parade — giving public workers the day off and closing schools. In just a few short hours, this area would be packed with rowdy Eagles fans, celebrating their long-awaited Super Bowl victory.



Anticipating the large crowds and cold temperatures, the Red Cross suggested the public dress warm, prepare for long walks, and bring snacks.

Public transit also geared up for the impending overload to their system. SEPTA’s regional rail sold out half-a-million transit tickets within 24 hours. Independence Blue Cross took on the costs of the Broad-Street and Market-Frankford subway lines.

The Super Bowl champions started from the Sports Complex, south of Oregon Avenue, and headed north up Broad Street.

The Eagles fans were more than ready.

With the warm sunlight pouring onto the Eagles Super Bowl victory parade. “E-A-G-L-E-S, EAGLES!” could be heard throughout the streets of Philadelphia.

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The parade began at 11 a.m. Although, people were gathering around the Art Museum steps some twelve hours prior. They even crossed the Delaware River via the Ben Franklin Bridge through the early morning hours.

There was nothing that could stop riled Eagles fans from participating in a city-wide celebration.

Medic (EMS) tents were positioned in two locations on the Ben Franklin Parkway by the Philadelphia Fire Department. Alpha-numeric “location markers” were also posted along the parkway “to clearly and easily identify a location or section … to facilitate communication in the event of an emergency.”


Road closures and parking restrictions along the parade route were mandated, while meter and time limit regulations from the Philadelphia Parking Authority (PPA) were not enforced.

Thus the celebrations rang out, wild and free, with the late-afternoon sunshine.

The Philadelphia Eagles were Super Bowl champions.

Written by Sam Antenucci

I was anticipating a rowdy crowd, after all the Eagles just won their very first Super Bowl. My group of friends and I ventured into the massive crowds around the Art Museum and were immediately overwhelmed with the sheer volume of Eagles fans. People of all ages gathered around, cheering to see their sports heroes paraded around after their victorious win against the Patriots.

parade crowd

Before we descended into the sea of green jerseys, we set a meeting point at a local café on Fairmount Avenue. The Red Cross suggested that groups traveling to the parade designate a meeting point in case anyone got lost in the shuffle. The Red Cross also ran a reunification center at 30th Street Station, assisting families separated by the frenzy of the parade.

With our phones at our side, we linked arms and made our way down as far as we could to see the parade. I was pleasantly surprised by the courtesy and energy of the crowd. Even through their excitement, a please and thank you went a long way. As my friends and I descended into the masses, we had several groups of people help find a good spot for us to see the parade by clearing paths to the procession.

We got as far as we could, when we decided to stay near a mother and her three children. When I asked them how they felt about the crowds, they told me that everyone was very courteous and looked out for each other. The mother told me how she didn’t any trouble getting her young kids to a nice spot to see the parade. Another woman and her friends stood ahead of us and began to explain that even though Eagles fans have a reputation for being a rough fan base, everyone was here to celebrate an amazing victory with their favorite team. That sense of community filled all of Philadelphia and it was apparent in the lively energy of the crowd. Whether you were a stranger or not, the sense of family, community, and security was felt by all that day.

trash truck

We found ourselves thoroughly enjoying the parade. We made sure to stand guard and watch after the woman’s children, making sure they wouldn’t get pushed around within the crowds and had a decent view of the show. Once the Eagles arrived on the busses, cheering and waving to the crowd, the fans reciprocated their excitement with cheers. Cell phones flew into the air to take videos and pictures. To be a part of this historical event was an honor that nearly all Philadelphians had the chance to experience as one united community!

While the parade was certainly new and exciting, it is always important to exercise caution when venturing out in crowds. In case you get separated from your group, make sure to let a local police officer know and establish ahead of time a meeting point everyone can go too. Take only the necessities like your cellphone, a small sum of money, water, snacks, and your I.D. card. Most importantly, as a community event, look out for one another, especially the elderly and the children. We are one giant community celebrating the marvelous victory of the Eagles. Philly reintroduced the meaning of our wonderful city’s name; the city of brotherly love.

The city of Philadelphia is flying high after the Eagles Super Bowl win. To celebrate the World Champions, the city will host a five-mile-long parade expected to draw more than two million people.

The parade will start at 11:00 a.m. Thursday near Lincoln Financial Field in South Philadelphia. A celebration at Eakin’s Oval on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway will start around 1 p.m. The entire event will end around 3 p.m.


If you are going to the parade, the American Red Cross wants you to enjoy the festivities and stay safe!

What to wear:

Thursday will be cold and breezy, so make sure you bundle up with layers, hats, gloves, and scarves. Temperatures will climb into the low 30s, but the wind will make it feel like it’s in the 20s through the afternoon. There will be a lot of walking to and from the parade so make sure to wear comfortable walking shoes.

What to bring:

Pack enough water, juice and snacks to sustain your group for much of the day. Do not leave bags unattended. Eat regularly. Food provides the body with energy for producing its own heat. Keep the body replenished with fluids to prevent dehydration. Avoid caffeine and alcohol. Caffeine, a stimulant, accelerates the symptoms of hypothermia. Alcohol is a depressant and hastens the effects of cold on the body. Alcohol also slows circulation and can make you less aware of the effects of cold. Both caffeine and alcohol can cause dehydration.

How to get there:

All visitors are encouraged to take public transit when coming into Philadelphia. If, however, driving is necessary, the City encourages drivers to park in off-street lots and garages along the Parkway, Broad Street, or near the stadium complex. Be sure to have a full tank of gas. There will be significant travel delays on both roadways and public transportation immediately before, during, and after the Eagles Parade. Be patient!

Where to “go”:

The city has placed 850 port-o-potties along the parade route. It’s also a good idea to bring toilet paper and hand sanitizer.

How to keep in touch:

Do not depend on cell phones to keep in contact with family and friends. With the large number of people expected to attend the parade, cell phone service will be limited. Texting usually works better than calling. Set up a meeting spot in case anyone from your group is separated. Ensure children have contact information for their parents or guardians on their person. Children should find a police officer if they become lost or separated.

Stay informed:

To receive important Eagles info from the City, like parade, transit, and public safety details, sign up for free ReadyPhila alerts. Text “ReadyEagles” to 888-777. Also, download the Red Cross First Aid app for tips on how to treat minor injuries. Two medical tents will also be located along the Parkway.

What to do:

Have lots of fun and stay safe! E-A-G-L-E-S, Eagles!


This Sunday, my beloved Philadelphia Eagles play the Denver Broncos. And believe it not, that has created somewhat of a quandary for me. Normally, it’s a no-brainer as to where my loyalties would lie. I’m a lifelong Eagles fan. (It took years of therapy to make that admission BTW.) But being in the disaster business, and working for the Red Cross in particular, it’s not that cut and dry — to the point where I’m actually asking myself, what should my rooting interest be?

I have nothing against the Broncos. I really like Peyton Manning and I like seeing him succeed. Colorado is beautiful. I don’t get to visit it to go skiing nearly enough.  I also have some wonderful Red Cross colleagues in Colorado. But this is the Eagles and if they have any hope of making the playoffs, they need to pull off an upset. So here’s my quandary.

Anyone who has been keeping up with the news, knows Denver and the state of Colorado have been through a lot this summer (and the last year for that matter.) (KUSA-TV story via USA Today). The past few weeks I’ve seen incredible footage of homes being wiped away by flooding, all on the heels of terrible wildfires the past two summers. I’ve read and heard the stories of families who lost their homes to wildfires last summer, just to see them get washed away by flooding this summer. My colleagues in Colorado have friends and neighbors who were directly affected. My heart breaks for the thousands of people who must start over.

Now I realize a football game won’t fix any of that. I realize that it is, in fact, just a game. But history has shown us that sports can play a big role in healing cities and communities affected by tragedy. Think of the impact sports had on New York City (and the country) after 9/11. Who wasn’t pulling for the Yankees in that World Series? Just a few short years after Katrina, no one could deny the positive impact the Saints winning the Super Bowl had on the city’s psyche and economy. After Sandy, the Giants helped NY and NJ mentally recover, at least for a few hours every week. Everyone was a Red Sox and Bruins fan in the weeks following the Boston Marathon bombing. Rooting against those teams was almost sacrilege.

Which brings me back to this Sunday’s Eagles game against the Broncos. If the Eagles were playing the Cowboys, I admit, it may be a different story. I don’t think I could ever bring myself to root for the Cowboys, no matter the circumstance. That’s just a fact of life of someone from Philadelphia. But Denver is a different story.


So what should I do? Let my lifelong love of the Eagles trump my genuine wish for the Broncos, in a small way, help the people of Denver feel better? Or toss my lifelong loyalty aside, this once, and root for a Broncos victory?

Ultimately, I turned to my Red Cross colleagues in Colorado for the answer. I saw through their tweets, photos, videos, and stories that demonstrated very clearly that the people of Colorado “got this.” With the help of agencies like the Red Cross and their fellow citizens, Coloradans are showing an unbelievable and inspiring resilience. Their ability to absorb what has happened and vow to overcome it, with no complaint, is remarkable.

Just like folks in New York, New Orleans, and Boston, Coloradans showed me that they don’t need me to root for their football team in order to feel loved and supported. Adversity brings out the best in us. It  brings out our selflessness. It brings out our love. It brings out our humanity. Those qualities make us winners and Colorado has plenty of all of them.

Go Eagles.