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Monthly Archives: June 2018

Summer is one of the most popular times of year for people in the United States to take a trip that involves international travel. If you are planning a trip which involves driving across a border, sailing to a coastline, or flying halfway around the world, the American Red Cross has some steps you can take to stay safe.

CTSY: NASA

  1. Download the first aid app. The American Red Cross first aid app puts expert advice for everyday emergencies in your hand. Whether you’re in the United States or abroad, arming yourself with basic first aid skills can save a life. Be sure to download the app while you’re still in the United States, otherwise you’ll download the local Red Cross or Red Crescent’s mobile app (which will be in the local language).
  2. Make a plan. Just like at home, it’s important to establish a time and place to meet family members in case you get separated.
  3. Know what natural disasters are possible. There’s no reason to panic, but it’s important to research whether your destination faces emergencies you’ve never experienced. While you’ll need to gauge the local context, the Red Cross offers basic tips about what to do during natural disasters like tsunamis, volcanoes, and hurricanes.
  4. Register your trip with the State Department. Enter your travel details with the free Smart Traveler Enrollment Program online, which allows the State Department to better assist you in case of an emergency while you are abroad. You can also get information about safety conditions in the country you are planning to visit.
  5. Write down contact details for the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate to carry with you in case of emergency while traveling.
  6. Check out the State Department’s ‘What the Department of State Can and Can’t Do in a Crisisand have an evacuation plan that doesn’t rely on the U.S. government.
  7. Keep your destination country’s emergency numbers handy. You know to use 911 in the United States, but how will you reach the fire department, police, or an ambulance abroad? Find your destination country on this reference sheet from the State Department—and write down the emergency numbers before you take off.
  8. Know the six-month passport rule. Some countries deny travelers entry if their passport expires in less than six months. Renew your passport about nine months before the expiration date.
  9. Let your credit card company know what countries you will be visiting and when. This way, they won’t think your card is stolen and shut it off just when you need it the most.
  10. Pack your International Certificate of Vaccination. Also referred to as the “yellow card,” it lists your immunizations, allergies, and blood type. The “yellow card” is available from your physician or local health department.
  11. Bring medications, bug repellent. If you’re traveling somewhere with mosquito-borne illnesses—such as malaria, dengue, or Zika—be sure to spray repellent and/or cover your arms and legs with lightweight clothing at critical times of the day. Don’t forget your medications and it’s a good idea to bring other stuff like OTC pain reliever and something for an upset stomach.
  12. Check for emergency exits and evacuation routes. The American Red Cross has helped many communities around the world install signs that indicate evacuation routes in case flooding or another natural disaster occurs. Be sure to identify evacuation routes at your destination and, as always, pay attention to the location of emergency exits.

The American Red Cross has named Guy Triano CEO of the Eastern Pennsylvania Region. The Bucks County resident is no stranger to the Red Cross.

guy

Triano has been with the non-profit organization for over 14 years, all in the biomedical field. He first joined the Red Cross as an account manager for Atlantic and Cape May counties. Most recently he served as Director of Donor Recruitment for the Pennsylvania-New Jersey and the New York-Pennsylvania blood regions where he was responsible for collecting 550,000 units of blood annually. He was named Director of the Year in 2015, 2016, and 2017.

“I’m proud to be a part of the American Red Cross because it is an organization that helps so many people in so many different ways,” said Triano. “After spending most of my time focusing on the collection of lifesaving blood, I’m excited to also be helping the organization’s many humanitarian services.”

Guy lives with his wife and two boys in Bucks County. Guy is also very involved with coaching both of his sons’ baseball teams and sits on the Board for Neshaminy Kids Club.

Triano now oversees the American Red Cross Eastern Pennsylvania Region, which includes more than 6.5 million people in 17 counties from Philadelphia north to the New York border.

In an average year the American Red Cross Eastern Pennsylvania Region:

  • Responds to more than 1,000 local disasters
  • Provides direct disaster assistance to more than 5,000 people
  • Installs approximately 10,000 free lifesaving smoke alarms
  • Trains nearly 100,000 people in first aid, CPR and other lifesaving skills
  • Provides almost 5,000 services for military members, veterans and their families
  • Trains approximately 8,000 students in disaster preparedness through The Pillowcase Project
  • Collects more than 150,000 blood donations

The Eastern Pennsylvania Region also operates the Red Cross House in Philadelphia, the only-of-its-kind Red Cross Center for Disaster Recovery in the United States.

 

Written by David Haas

For four days, volunteers and employees of Eastern Pennsylvania Red Cross received extensive training as part of the yearly Disaster Institute.  Held on the campus of Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC), more that 140 individuals participated in 45 classes ranging from Forklift Fundamentals to Mass Casualty Incident Response.

Room

The purpose of the Institute, according to Kate Crowley, Institute Director and Mass Care Regional Program Lead, is to provide Red Crossers with the opportunity to add Group Activity Position (GAP) skills to their disaster deployment capabilities. There are more than 50 GAP skills needed by the Red Cross to support large scale disaster response, including communications, financial support, mass feeding, shelter management, and spiritual care.

In the area of shelter management, for example, Robert Schmidt and Carol Aldridge took more than a dozen participants through a full day of training on the fundamentals of operating a shelter including resourcing, operation, and management of the housing, feeding and safety of shelter guests. This was followed by a second day of hands-on shelter simulation covering the management of guest registration, feeding, and sleeping.

ERV

Other full-day training sessions covered the Red Cross Concept of Operations, Excel skills, and Supervising the Workforce.

Another purpose of the workshop, according to Janice Winston, leader of workshops on Collaboration and Government Operations, is to give Red Crossers a chance to get to know each other.  With more than 3,000 volunteers in the region working in very diverse areas, it can be difficult to connect with others. During events organized by staff and volunteers, the group participated in a BBQ cookout, softball game, and other events.

To see more pictures, visit http://bit.ly/2M3mzAc

Hurricane Isaac 2012

It’s that time of year when the temperature goes up and heat and humidity, which can be deadly, make being outdoors very uncomfortable. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 600 people in the United States are killed by extreme heat every year. The American Red Cross has steps you can take to help stay safe when the temperatures soar.

HEAT SAFETY TIPS

Some people are more at risk of developing a heat-related illness, including adults age 65 and older, those with chronic medical conditions, people who work outside, infants and children and athletes. Here are steps you should take in hot weather:

  • Hot cars can be deadly. Never leave children or pets in your vehicle. The inside temperature of the car can quickly reach 120 degrees.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • If someone doesn’t have air conditioning, they should seek relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day in places like schools, libraries, theaters, malls, etc.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat. Take frequent breaks if working outdoors.
  • Check on animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat. Make sure they have plenty of cool water.

HEAT EXHAUSTION Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. If someone is experiencing heat cramps in the legs or abdomen, get them to a cooler place, have them rest, lightly stretch the affected muscle, and replenish their fluids with a half a glass (about 4 ounces) of cool water every 15 minutes.

If someone is exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion (cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, exhaustion), move them to a cooler place, remove or loosen tight clothing and spray the person with water or apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If they are conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition. If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 9-1-1.

HEAT STROKE LIFE-THREATENING Signs include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting and high body temperature. Call 9-1-1 immediately if someone shows signs of heat stroke. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by immersing them up to their neck in cold water if possible. Otherwise, douse or spray the person with cold water, or cover the person with cold, wet towels or bags of ice.

DOWNLOAD RED CROSS APPS The Red Cross app “Emergency” can help keep you and your loved ones safe by putting vital information in your hand and settings for more than 35 different severe weather and emergency alerts including heat advisories and excessive heat warnings. The Red Cross First Aid App puts instant access to information on handling the most common first aid emergencies at your fingertips including heat-related emergencies. Download these apps by searching for ‘American Red Cross’ in your app store or at redcross.org/apps.

Hurricane Maria 2017

Barceloneta, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Red Cross volunteers distribute water, food and other basic necessities to families affected by Hurricane Maria. Photo by Sergio Rojas for The American Red Cross

In a year marked by historic hurricanes, wildfires and other crises, the American Red Cross was there for a record number of people whose lives were upended by major events.  Last fall was unprecedented in terms of the scope and scale of our mission delivery.  We provided food, water, reconnected families, and mobilized thousands of relief supplies, including comfort kits, blankets and cleanup kits to help rebuild lives.  Everything we do depends on the needs of the people that we serve and we could not be there without the generous support of our partners.  Thank you for bringing hope to those in need.

-Toll Brothers SKF USA

  • Duane Morris
  • PJM Interconnection
  • Vanguard
  • Tanner Industries
  • Ametek Foundation
  • Bentley Systems
  • Dietz & Watson

Written by Sam Antenucci

We underestimate the importance of the letters A, B, and O. When these letters are missing from a sentence, it ceases to make sense. Likewise, these letters hold the utmost importance in our hospitals. Representing the main blood type groups, they can mean the difference between life or death. Unfortunately, hospitals nationwide have been going through extreme shortages in our blood supplies and have reached dangerously low levels.

Missing Type

In response to the shortages, The Red Cross is kicking off The Missing Types Campaign to address and bring awareness to the shortages during the summer months. Since 2013, there has been a decreasing number of Red Cross donors, declining by 80,000 people each year. To make matters worse, every two seconds, someone in the U. S. needs a blood transfusion. This disproportion in donors and the high demand of blood has left many hospital’s supplies low and shelves empty.

blood donors

U.S. Health officials state that over 13 million units of blood are needed yearly to keep up with the demand for patients in need. Though the Red Cross provides 40% of that blood, only 3% of the population donates annually. The frightening reality of going to the hospital and needing a blood transfusion, only to find your type is no longer available, is one many patients will soon have to face.

Without the generosity of blood donors, patients with various cancers, traumas, and chronic diseases might not be able to get the blood that they desperately need to stay alive and healthy. Fortunately, this was not the case for a brave 2-year-old, Lindsey Crowder. At the time of her lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosis, Lindsey and her family went through a two-year chemotherapy regiment that put her into remission. However, once Lindsey turned six, she relapsed and had to rely on over 100 different blood transfusions to keep her healthy and give her another chance to recover. Lindsey’s mother, Lisa recalled, “Without the generous donors, I don’t know where we would be. Which is why we are now donors.”

Normally, you might not realize the importance of the letters A, B, and O, until they are gone. Likewise, these letters are vanishing from our hospitals shelves, leaving many critical patients without the blood they desperately need. You are the missing type, and by donating this summer season, you can save three lives with your life saving donation. You can give life to more patients like Lindsey by signing up for a blood drive near you on the Red Cross’s website: http://www.redcrossblood.org/give. You can also read more stories like Lindsey’s and see how your donation will make a difference to those in need, here at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/how-blood-donations-help.html.

The American Red Cross is pleased to announce that one million 3rd through 5th grade students across the country have learned how to prepare themselves, their households and their communities for emergencies by participating in The Pillowcase Project.

Pillowcase Project- General Charles Harker 2- 2018

Originally created in New Orleans, The Pillowcase Project is a free program inspired by the story of local university students carrying their belongings in pillowcases during Hurricane Katrina evacuations. During the presentation, participants receive a pillowcase to decorate and then take home to use as a personal emergency supplies kit.

The curriculum is structured by a Learn, Practice, Share framework. Students learn about the science of a locally relevant hazard and how to best prepare for it. They practice what to do if a disaster occurs and how to cope with related fear and stress. Afterwards, they share the information and skills they have learned with their family and friends so everyone in the household knows what to do.

To date, 11 lives have been saved by four students who put into practice what they learned through the program. Last year, 9-year-old Camryn Sarnie of Ramona, Oklahoma was startled awake at 3:00 a.m. by a smoke alarm sounding in his home. The sound scared Camryn, but he recognized it and knew that it was alerting him to a fire. He knew that he had less than two minutes to escape, so he quickly woke up his parents, alerted them to the fire and instructed them to evacuate immediately. Camryn saved three lives that morning, including his own, by putting into practice what he learned just a few weeks earlier from The Pillowcase Project presentation at his school. According to Camryn’s mother, Lora, “Camryn told us all about what he learned in class after the presentation. Camryn is a true hero.”

AmysPillowcase

The Red Cross has engaged more than 35,000 volunteers and partnered with more than 13,000 schools, community organizations and partners to deliver this program to students across the country and at more than a dozen U.S. military stations abroad. The Walt Disney Company is the founding sponsor of the program. Additional information about The Pillowcase Project is available at redcross.org/pillowcase.